Creativity + Science: Make Way for the Connected Creativist

Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man has long been a symbol of the convergence of math and art…but he’s also 526 years old. Maybe it’s time for an upgrade.

That’s exactly what Simon Shaw, Chief Creative Officer, Global Center of Creative Strategy for Hill+Knowlton Strategies, and H+K’s U.K. CEO and Chair of the Global Center of Creative Strategy Richard Millar will argue on Wednesday, September 21 in London at the opening of Creativity+Science, a daylong series of lectures and conversations hosted by H+K. At the gathering, some of the most inspired minds from a wide range of scientific disciplines will re-examine the intersection of science, creativity, and communication at a time when technology is both ubiquitous and shifting rapidly beneath our thumbs.

“The Vitruvian Man has been replaced by the Connected Creativist,” Shaw says. “The democratization of access to technology, knowledge, and making are giving rise to what we call the ‘Connected Creativist.’ It’s driving a new movement of invention.”

+Technology

Experimentation and innovation are no longer confined to laboratories and men in white coats. Technologies such as 3D printers are becoming increasingly affordable and user-friendly for those without an engineering degree. Printed dresses, body parts, and even pizza are crossing disciplinary boundaries and spurring rapid innovation.

The debut of the smartphone afforded technological luxuries to the average tech user and birthed a number of innovations. Google Play offers 2.2 million apps for download, including Uber, Instagram, Venmo—apps and businesses that have turned established business models on their head and created new ones.

“Your scientific knowledge no longer limits your creativity. If you have an idea, then there is someone who has the knowledge to make it a reality.”

+Knowledge

The democratization of technology has also brought about the democratization of the knowledge required to make full use of that technology. More importantly, it has given Connected Creativists the tools to find each other, share knowledge, and collaborate.

“The rising global population of 7 billion people – many of whom are now or will be connected through technology – is driving a whole new era of crowdsourced revolution,” says Millar. “Your scientific knowledge no longer limits your creativity. If you have an idea, then there is someone who has the knowledge to make it a reality.”

Some argue that crowdsourcing will prove to be similar to cloud computing in the way it revolutionizes business and technology. Crowdsourcing allows Connected Creativists to share fledgling ideas and invite the rest of the world to contribute, hone, and build the concept. The diversity of the global Internet presents Connected Creativists with the potential to meet people who have technical skills and knowledge that they lack, as well as unique perspectives and approaches to problem solving.

This exchange is not one-sided. Sites such as Zooniverse, a research platform that provides a space for volunteers to contribute to academic research, provide scientists with crowdsourced information. Scientists crowdsource creative ideas, just as creatives crowdsource scientific knowledge.

“I think the future will involve more interdisciplinary work, with scientists developing the language to communicate effectively with those outside their immediate fields,” says Dr. Caitriona Jackman, Associate Professor of Space Physics at the University of Southampton. “In addition to interdisciplinary exchanges on a technical level, I believe that engaging the general public with scientific research is beneficial for all concerned. It forces scientists to find creative ways of explaining high-level concepts, and can spark ideas for new approaches. The days of lone working are numbered!”

“Scientists have been for doing this for centuries; the important thing is for creative industries to recognize that only by combining the two can you solve some of the world’s biggest problems.”

+Making

Unprecedented access to the tools required to actually make things is also changing the nature of business. The time between inspiration and production has been shrinking steadily as it becomes easier for Connected Creativists to create their own prototypes.

Local Motors, for example, has opened up the car design process to allow online visitors to collaborate, and is disrupting the traditional assembly line model by manufacturing locally through a network of “micro-factories.” The idea galvanized General Electric to partner with the company to create “open-source” cars. Together, the companies are using collaborative methods and micro-manufacturing to appliances. Businesses big and small, old and new, are leveraging the scientific tools newly at their disposal to innovate within their industries.

+Communication

The rise of the Connected Creativist has opened up new business and collaboration opportunities for marketers, too. Agencies must remain nimble, agile, and open to new ideas to keep up with global innovation, whether that means bringing clients onto new platforms such as Snapchat or creating products that are tailored to a client’s specific needs.

“Science and creativity have always been intertwined – just look at innovators like Leonardo Da Vinci, Ada Lovelace and Elon Musk,” says Clare Jones, Global Partnership Director at what3words, a company that aims to define any 3-meter-by-3-meter square in the world using a unique combination of three words. “Scientists have been for doing this for centuries; the important thing is for creative industries to recognize that only by combining the two can you solve some of the world’s biggest problems.”

posted by Magnify Team | September 20, 2016@
http://www.hkstrategies.com/creativity-science-connected-creativist/

Please contact us for more information.